Abstract

Accuracy in vein detection is important for intravenous applications such as venipuncture and other medical procedures. The near-infrared (NIR) imaging technique is used to visualize veins based on the difference of absorption of the infrared light by the oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and surrounding tissue. A problem commonly found during the visualization of veins is attributed to the source of light, saturation, low contrast, and dispersion, which are causes of inhomogeneous illumination. In this work, the design and implementation of a light source with LEDs in the range of 750–860 nm are presented. To obtain the design, a numerical simulation was made using the near-field diffraction theory to obtain homogeneous illumination at 40 cm of the sample, with a radial arrangement of three concentric LED rings. With the developed light source, an experimental scheme for the acquisition of vein patterns was implemented. Using a basic algorithm for the identification of intravenous patterns, a prototype was obtained that we believe can be used in intravenous applications and other medical procedures.

© 2020 Optical Society of America

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