Abstract

This paper describes a process which produces finished poisitive pictures, directly from the camera, in about one minute after the exposure. The camera is described as containing a strip of paper in addition to the negative material and as feeding this strip of paper, in contact with the exposed negative, through simple pressure rollers and thence out of the camera box. The process to be used with the camera is described as having but one step, instead of the many steps of conventional photography; and it is shown that this can be achieved by associating with the strips a reagent which, when spread between the two strips by the pressure of the rollers, is capable of developing the silver halide of the negative and forming the positive image at one and the same time. Several classes of processes are discussed, their characteristics explored and certain principles established for obtaining satisfactory picture quality, stability, speed of operation, etc. In one of these processes, the reagent spread between the negative and the positive strip consists of a small amount of viscous liquid containing, in rather high concentration, the necessary constituents for developing the negative image, for forming at the same time a silver complex with the unexposed grains in the negative, for transferring the soluble complex to the positive sheet, and there creating and stabilizing the positive silver image. This process runs to completion in about one minute. When the two strips are peeled apart, both are essentially dry. One strip is the finished positive picture. The process operates at temperatures from less than 30°F to over 100°F. The paper discusses the control of the rates of reduction, silver ion complex formation, and ion diffusion in the several reaction fronts; principles of stabilization of the positive picture; control of the relative rates of growth of density in negative and positive; conversion of the silver ions to particles of silver of adequate size and the control of the color of the image as a function of particle size; and various characteristic curves which have been obtained with different negative materials. These factors are then interpreted with relation to the photographic usefulness of the process.

© 1947 Optical Society of America

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References

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