Abstract

The type of blur involved in an optical image can be specified by describing the distribution of illuminance across the image of a narrow line. This is called the blur function. If the blur function conforms to the normal curve, the image of a grating will gradually fuse as the spacing decreases without undergoing “spurious resolution.” This property of a Gaussian blur function makes it possible to use it in analyzing the effects obtained with other types of blur. This approach to the problem also explains why there is a poor correlation between the resolution of gratings and the Cobb-Fry index of blur.

© 1961 Optical Society of America

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