Abstract

Our manuscript contained data from unconverged rigorous coupled wave approximation (RCWA) simulations that resulted in incorrect description of minima locations. Here, converged RCWA simulations are presented with corrected minima behavior described. The principle of plasmonic enhancement and its use in ellipsometric test structures is maintained.

© 2016 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. S. O’Mullane, B. Peterson, J. Race, N. Keller, and A. C. Diebold, “Enhancing one dimensional sensitivity with plasmonic coupling,” Opt. Express 22(21), 26246–26253 (2014).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  2. S. O’Mullane, N. Keller, J. Race, and A. C. Diebold, “Utilizing Tunable Absorption Properties of Light for Enhanced Ellipsometry of Metal Gratings” (to be published).
  3. S. O’Mullane, “Plasmonic Enhancement of the Ellipsometric Measurement of Thin Metal Lines,” Ph.D. thesis, SUNY Albany (2015).

2014 (1)

Diebold, A. C.

S. O’Mullane, B. Peterson, J. Race, N. Keller, and A. C. Diebold, “Enhancing one dimensional sensitivity with plasmonic coupling,” Opt. Express 22(21), 26246–26253 (2014).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

S. O’Mullane, N. Keller, J. Race, and A. C. Diebold, “Utilizing Tunable Absorption Properties of Light for Enhanced Ellipsometry of Metal Gratings” (to be published).

Keller, N.

S. O’Mullane, B. Peterson, J. Race, N. Keller, and A. C. Diebold, “Enhancing one dimensional sensitivity with plasmonic coupling,” Opt. Express 22(21), 26246–26253 (2014).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

S. O’Mullane, N. Keller, J. Race, and A. C. Diebold, “Utilizing Tunable Absorption Properties of Light for Enhanced Ellipsometry of Metal Gratings” (to be published).

O’Mullane, S.

S. O’Mullane, B. Peterson, J. Race, N. Keller, and A. C. Diebold, “Enhancing one dimensional sensitivity with plasmonic coupling,” Opt. Express 22(21), 26246–26253 (2014).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

S. O’Mullane, N. Keller, J. Race, and A. C. Diebold, “Utilizing Tunable Absorption Properties of Light for Enhanced Ellipsometry of Metal Gratings” (to be published).

Peterson, B.

Race, J.

S. O’Mullane, B. Peterson, J. Race, N. Keller, and A. C. Diebold, “Enhancing one dimensional sensitivity with plasmonic coupling,” Opt. Express 22(21), 26246–26253 (2014).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

S. O’Mullane, N. Keller, J. Race, and A. C. Diebold, “Utilizing Tunable Absorption Properties of Light for Enhanced Ellipsometry of Metal Gratings” (to be published).

Opt. Express (1)

Other (2)

S. O’Mullane, N. Keller, J. Race, and A. C. Diebold, “Utilizing Tunable Absorption Properties of Light for Enhanced Ellipsometry of Metal Gratings” (to be published).

S. O’Mullane, “Plasmonic Enhancement of the Ellipsometric Measurement of Thin Metal Lines,” Ph.D. thesis, SUNY Albany (2015).

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Mueller Matrix element M12 vs the wavelength of light for varying CDY simulated by both FEM and RCWA. Good agreement found for location of plasmonic effects [2].
Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Covariation schematic detailing plasmon minima location with respect to CD and pitch (of the smaller grating in the cross-grating) with sensitivity color-scale listed on right-hand side. These are example values calculated for approximately median minima. λ location plasmon is where the localized minima appears in an M12 spectra, λ measured max is the limit of the tool or simulator, λ converged mostly is the point where changes in CD have little effect, comparable to standard copper line array sensitivity [3].
Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Large-scale CD variation of smaller grating, demonstrating convergence towards single minima for larger CD values. For example, significantly more sensitivity to change in CD for 12 to 22 nm transition than 22 to 32 nm transition. Large blocks at bottom refer to primary order, smaller blocks near −0.4 M12 are for second order localized plasmons, color code can be found in Fig. 2. For the simulations shown, λ measured max = 1800 nm, λ converged mostly = 1375 nm [3].

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